0% Plagiarism Guaranteed & Custom Written

Understand the key features of the events industry

Unit 1: Understanding the Events Industry

Unit reference number: L/600/8549 
Level: 3
Credit value: 3
Guided learning hours: 19

Unit aim

This unit introduces learners to the events industry. It covers the considerable range of activities that fall within the scope of event management. Learners will research the various types of event, the significant range in size of events and the international nature of the industry. They will also look at how the events industry links with other industry sectors and the contribution it makes to the UK economy.

Finally, learners will investigate career pathways and evaluate the skills that can be gained through working in the events industry.

Essential resources

There are no special resources needed for this unit.

Learning outcomes, assessment criteria and unit amplification:

To pass this unit, the learner needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

 

Learning outcomes

Assessment Criteria

Unit Amplification

1

Understand the key features of the events industry

Evaluate different concepts of what is meant by ‘event’

Different concepts of an event: events can be single events, on single sites, spread over several days, held on several sites sequentially and concurrently; events that are ticketed, events that are open/non- ticketed

 

 

Describe scope of events industry

Range of different types of event: sport, exhibitions, charity fund raising, music concerts, music festivals, arts festivals, street parties, product launches, firework displays, automotive festivals/gatherings, antiques fairs, banquets, conferences, garden/horticultural shows, beauty and fashion shows

 

 

Explain the contribution that the events industry makes to the UK economy and society

Current value of the UK events industry, projected growth of the industry

How the events industry contributes to UK economy and society: through tourism, retail sales, employment of event staff, employment of contractors and sub-contractors, purchase and hire of facilities and equipment, development of innovative lighting and sound techniques and systems

 

 

Explain the links between the events industry and other industries in the UK

Links between the events industry and other industries in the UK: security, hospitality, automotive, acoustic engineering, logistics, customer service, construction, graphic design, media, tourism, marketing, IT and communications

 

 

Explain the international nature of the events industry

International nature of the events industry: global organisations involved in the events industry; how the events industry is used to facilitate global merchandising; how events are promoted and viewed internationally; how the internet enables and encourages events to be worldwide; how cheap travel has opened access to events in remote locations

 

 

Define the five main sectors within the events industry

 

Main sectors within the events industry: music and the arts; beauty, fashion and cosmetics; automotive; retail; hospitality, food and drink; sport leisure and recreation

 

 

Describe the key features of the main sectors within the events industry

Music and the arts sector features include classical and pop concerts, music festivals, radio road shows; how the range of venues used, duration of events and audience profiles varies significantly, how severe weather affects certain types of event, the impact of this on planning

Beauty, fashion and cosmetics sector features include the closed nature of such events, the need for seating, lighting, audio and staging, the promotional aspect of the events and the implications of it

Automotive sector features include new product or model launches, the specific type of venue required, the implications for security, access and transport needs

Retail, hospitality, food and drink sector features include the wide range of events and types of venues used, the equipment required, the health and safety implications, the impact on security requirements, the non- ticketing arrangements which make it difficult to predict attendance numbers

Sport leisure and recreation sector features include regional, national and international scope of events, the duration and timing of events, the implications for security, access and transport to and from venues, the impact of severe weather

2

Understand the main functions within the events industry

Define the four main functions within the events industry

Four main functions within the events industry: meetings, incentives, conferences and conventions, and exhibitions and events

 

 

Describe the planning and implementation cycle for events

Planning and implementation cycle for events: identify aims of event, research and identify means of delivering event aims, prepare detailed plan to achieve aims, evaluate plan, implement event plan, evaluate event

Importance of ensuring each phase of the cycle is completed

 

 

Evaluate the importance of each phase in the event planning and management cycle

Importance of the different phases in event planning and management: identifying aims so that success factors can be set out to judge performance and later used to evaluate the event; preparing a detailed operational plan so that key roles and responsibilities can be assigned, so that sequences of tasks can be set out and deadlines agreed; implementing the plan so that all involved can monitor progress of specific phases against deadlines, so that interventions may be made where needed to bring the plan back to target; evaluating the event so that success in meeting original aims is accurately assessed and used to plan future events

3

Understand the legal, social and ethical framework for events

Identify the main areas of legislation that cover the planning and organisation of events, including health and safety and contract law

Main areas of legislation that cover the planning and organisation of events: health and safety, contract law, human resources and employment, events venue legislation

 

 

Explain the implications of four different areas of legislation for the plannings and organisation of event

Implications of different legislation for the planning and organisation of events: employment conditions for event staff, risk assessment of venues, legal responsibilities of contractors, liabilities of event staff, contractors

How these affect how to plan for safety and wellbeing for different events at different venues

 

 

Describe the main ethical and social issues that affect the events industry

Social and ethical issues: prioritising the welfare of those attending events over profit, ensuring staffing and facilities are adequate to maintain safety; marketing and selling ethically, taking into account local community needs, environmental impact and sustainability of resources when organising events

 

 

Explain the implications of four different types of ethical and social concerns for the planning and organisation of events

Implications of ethical concerns: ethical merchandising such as ensuring that items on sale at the event are ethically sourced and sold; avoiding environmental impact at the venue such as damage to the site, inadequate waste control or management, noise; using sustainable resources for the event such as using recycled materials

Social concerns: planning for the welfare of those attending the event such as providing adequate rest rooms, transport and access to the venue or a range of food that meets the needs of different ages, groups and ethnic origins; how ethical and social concerns may deter attendance or reduce time spent at the event; how concerns may create adverse publicity and impact on future events

4

Understand the key features of two contrasting sectors of the events industry

Compare the purpose of two contrasting sectors of the events industry

How the different event sectors contrast in purpose: the main aims of the different event sectors, e.g. financial profit, technological advancement, increasing sales, attracting potential buyers and customers, changing lifestyles, influencing opinions or interest; how aims are short term and long term; how some aims overlap

 

 

Describe the diversity of the different types of organisations that make up the events industry

Diverse nature of the events industry: large multi-national  organisations, e.g. automotive, beauty and fashion, sports governing bodies; small organisations working at a local or regional level, e.g. food producers; community groups; organisations that provide support or services for events, e.g. catering, security, transport, special effects, marketing and promotion, ticketing and sales

 

 

Compare the economic and social value of two contrasting sectors of the events industry

How the different sectors contrast in economic and social value; how the different sectors contribute economically, e.g. through employing people, taxable profits, purchasing supplies, employing contractors and sub-contractors, generating income for local community businesses, increasing take-up and use of venues and facilities; how the different sectors contribute socially, e.g. through creating local interest in venues or events, through highlighting local needs, through improving access to venues and their surroundings

 

 

Explain factors driving change in two contrasting sectors

Factors driving change in the different sectors: demand for live events, increase in small scale events, greater specialism of events, the need for more effective merchandising at events, ethical and environmental factors influencing attendance at events

How these factors impact on the different event sectors

 

 

Describe the typical range of events that take place in two contrasting sectors

Typical range of events in the sectors: music and the arts sector, e.g. classical and pop concerts, music festivals, radio road shows; beauty, fashion and cosmetics, e.g. road shows, promotions, exhibitions, product launches; automotive, e.g. shows, displays, competitions, product launches; retail, hospitality, food and drink, e.g. festivals, banquets, product launches, exhibitions; sport recreation and leisure, e.g. sports matches, tournaments, marathons, conferences, community events, firework displays

 

 

Explain the roles of key organisations in two contrasting sectors, including any representative and regulatory bodies and trade associations

Roles of key organisations, representative and regulatory bodies and trade associations: The Association of British Professional Conference Organisers, Association of Event Organisers, Meeting Industry Association, Association for Conferences and Events, Event and Entertainment Management Association, IMEX, ICCA, HSE, Local Authorities, Sports Governing Bodies, Security Industry Authority

 

 

Explain the links that two contrasting sectors in the industry have with other industries

Links between the various events sectors and other industries: security, hospitality, automotive, acoustic engineering, logistics, customer service, construction, graphic design, media, tourism, marketing and retail

5

Understand employment and career opportunities in the events industry

Evaluate three sources of reliable and relevant information on career progression, training and education in the events industry

Sources of reliable and relevant information on career progression, training and education in the events industry: the National Careers Service, Guardian Careers, Event Jobsearch, local Colleges and Universities

Range of training and qualification courses available locally, nationally, internationally

 

 

Describe potential career pathways in the five different sectors within the events industry

Potential career pathways in the different sectors within the events industry: what experience is required for entry-level jobs in the different sectors, what progression can be expected; the typical salary ranges for different levels in the industry; the value of voluntary and part-time jobs in gaining experience; what event organisers look for in terms of qualities, expertise and experience for event staff; what additional training, skills and qualities may be required to progress in the events industry

 

 

Identify the qualities, expertise and experience required to progress in th events industry

Qualities, expertise and experience required to progress in the events industry include project management, time management and multi- tasking, team working, planning and organisation, marketing and promotion, effective communications, problem solving, working to financial targets, meeting deadlines, decision making, remaining calm under pressure

 

 

Explain how skills and knowledge acquired in their sector could relate to job opportunities elsewhere

Transferable skills: how skills and knowledge acquired in event management could relate to job opportunities elsewhere, e.g. security work, marketing and promoting products, managing teams, planning and organising work schedules, e.g. in logistics or manufacturing, research work including data collection and analysis, customer service


100% Plagiarism Free & Custom Written, Tailored to your instructions